Edwin St. Aubin | Sterling Heights Real Estate, Troy Real Estate, Shelby Real Estate


Selling a home may prove to be a long, arduous process. However, if you act as a reasonable home seller, you can identify home selling challenges and overcome such problems without delay.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that you can use to become a reasonable home seller.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

Real estate is complex, particularly for home sellers. Fortunately, many housing market resources are available to help you become a real estate expert.

For example, any home seller can perform an online search to evaluate the housing market in any city or town. Then, a home seller can use this real estate data to analyze the prices of houses that are similar to his or her own and price a residence appropriately.

Home sellers also should look at the prices of recently sold houses in nearby areas. That way, a home seller can find out whether he or she is preparing to enter a seller's or buyer's market and plan accordingly.

2. Try Not to Get Too Emotional

Let's face it – any home selling journey likely includes plenty of ups and downs. But a home seller who understands the best- and worst-case home selling scenarios may be better equipped than others to stay calm, cool and collected, even in the most challenging situations.

Although a home seller may expect his or her home to sell quickly, it is important to set realistic expectations before you list a residence. This will enable you to avoid potential pitfalls that otherwise can prevent you from achieving your home selling goals.

For example, a home seller who receives a home appraisal will have a good idea about the true value of his or her house. And if the home seller receives a home offer that falls well below the appraisal amount, he or she won't feel disappointed. Instead, this home seller should have no trouble politely declining or countering the proposal.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about how to price your home or promote your house to the right groups of homebuyers, it often pays to get expert help. Lucky for you, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals can help you make informed home selling decisions.

A real estate agent possesses comprehensive housing market expertise and is happy to share his or her home selling insights with you. This means if you ever have questions about what to include in a home listing, your real estate agent can help you out. Or, if you are uncertain about whether to upgrade your house's interior or exterior, your real estate agent is available to provide honest, unbiased home improvement recommendations.

Becoming a reasonable home seller can make a world of difference in any housing market, at any time. Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can quickly and effortlessly navigate the home selling journey.


After you receive an offer on your home, how should you respond? Ultimately, there are many questions for a home seller to consider before accepting a proposal, including:

1. What is my home worth?

Did you get your home appraised before you added it to the real estate market? If so, you may want to review a home offer in contrast to your home appraisal. This will give you a better idea about whether the offer is "fair" based on your home's condition.

If you have not received a home appraisal, there's no need to worry. In fact, there are many ways to assess your home to determine whether to accept or decline a proposal.

Check out the prices of comparable residences in your city or town. This will enable you to see how these houses are priced and better understand how to proceed with an offer.

Also, review the prices of homes that recently sold in your area. With this information, you can learn about the current state of the housing market.

2. Are there any other offers to consider?

As a home seller, you'll likely have 24 to 48 hours to respond to an offer on your residence. But if you receive multiple offers at the same time, you'll want to evaluate these proposals in conjunction with one another.

Even if you receive two offers for the exact same price, these proposals may differ.

For example, a homebuyer who has financing in hand will be able to streamline the process of going from homebuyer to homeowner. On the other hand, a homebuyer who submits an offer without financing in hand may require additional time to secure a mortgage from a bank or credit union.

Take a close look at all of the offers on your home. Review these proposals with a fine-tooth comb, and you'll be able to make an informed decision.

3. Does this offer meet or exceed my expectations?

An offer on your home may fall short of your initial asking price, but this offer can still meet or surpass your expectations.

Consider what you hope to accomplish as a home seller as you review an offer.

For instance, if your goal is to sell your home as quickly as possible, you may be more inclined to accept one of the first offers you receive. Or, if you can afford to remain patient, you may want to take a wait-and-see approach to ensure you get an offer that matches or exceeds your initial asking price.

4. What will happen if I accept the offer?

After you accept an offer on your home, a homebuyer likely will want to complete a home inspection.

If the home inspection goes well, the homebuyer probably will proceed with his or her purchase. If it does not, you may need to complete home maintenance or repairs to finalize the purchase agreement.

Remember, if you accept an offer, there are still several steps that will need to be completed before you sell your house. With an expert real estate agent at your side, you'll know exactly what to expect at each stage of the home selling process.


One of the many things emphasized to sellers is removing their personality from the home. Too much personality in the home can be a distraction for potential homebuyers. Consider a model home, which automatically draws you in, from the biggest of details to the smallest. Most model homes have neutral colored rooms, rugs, and décor. The reason behind this? To give the potential homebuyer the opportunity to visualize themselves living in that home. You want to replicate that approach. Here are a few tips for depersonalizing your home: Pictures: Displaying family photos in the home is a great way to show that you made this place a home. However, when it comes to selling, it’s best to remove these photos. Too many pictures and frames can make it difficult for potential homebuyers to visualize themselves and their family living there. Personal belongings: If you are still living in the home that you are selling, your personal belongings will likely be all over the house. It’s impossible for you to remove everything you own from a home when you are still living there. However, it is important to clean up and hide certain personal belongings when you can. This includes children’s toys, animal toys and beds, knick-knacks, and drawings and grocery lists from the refrigerator door. Placing these items in storage or just finding places around the house to store them while trying to sell is best. Paint: Paint is a way of expressing yourself in your home. Whether you like really dark colors, warm colors, or cool colors or even just white, it showcases your personality. Drastic color schemes on either side of the color wheel can throw buyers off, especially if it contains colors that they are not really fond of. It will make it difficult for them to visualize how they would decorate that room. If this sounds like you, it’s a good idea to go to the store and pick up some neutral tones and get to painting. Furniture: Staging is everything. You may have set up your living room or bedroom a certain way because that’s how you like it. However, that may not be the optimal use of that space. It’s best to do some research or hire a professional to assist with this. You have to pull your personal opinion out of the decision-making and think about what works best with the shape and size of the room. Whenever possible it’s best to provide the homebuyer with a clean slate. Neutral colors and removing personal belongings will only increase the chances that potential homebuyers will envision themselves living there and hopefully make an offer. Depersonalizing your home is just one tactic for prepping your home for selling. If you are looking to sell quickly, be sure to read all the tips and tricks there are to getting you’re home sold.

Selling your home can conjure up a variety of emotions, ranging from exuberance to sadness. If you associate your home with raising a family or starting a life with your spouse, then putting it on the market can be a bittersweet experience. In addition to the emotional side of things, there's also the stress that inevitably comes with change and uncertainty. Putting your house up for sale raises several fear-based questions in your mind, such as "How long will it take to find a buyer?" On the average, houses remain on the market for a month or two, but it's not unusual for it to take much longer. To complicate matters: If you're in the position of selling your home before you have another one to move into, then your stress level is probably even higher. Although some factors are outside of your control, such as ever-changing market conditions, there are a few ways you can tip the scales in your direction. Pick the Right Real Estate Agent The real estate agent or Realtor you choose can make a big difference in how fast your home sells and the price it ultimately sells for. A seasoned agent can also make the whole experience a lot less stressful by providing regular progress reports and helping you navigate through the various disclosures, inspections, and paperwork that's required. An exceptional real estate pro will also provide you with valuable advice on how to improve the marketability and appearance of your property. Since "time is of the essence" when you put your home up for sale, it's important to get as many qualified prospects walking through your house, as possible. Good salesmanship, competitive pricing, and sharp negotiating skills can also help bring in bonafide offers on your property -- possibly even multiple offers. Stress Reduction Tips For Home Sellers In addition to having the support of a dependable real estate agent, there are also other strategies you can use to maintain your equilibrium.
  1. Make lists of all the things that need to be done, so that you don't wake up in the middle of the night wondering if you forgot to do something important. Staying mentally organized is one of the keys to feeling like you have some control over all the chaos that's going on in your life. Writing things down is also the first step to getting them completed. Keeping track of appointments, documents you need to gather, and professionals to confer with can also help prevent delays, miscommunication, or confusion.
  2. Schedule time for recreation, entertainment, and physical activity. Selling a home can bring with it a lot of ups and downs, so activities like socializing with friends, going for a walk in nature, or meditating can help maintain a positive outlook and a more balanced perspective on things.
Perhaps the most desirable attitude to adopt is to expect the best, but be prepared for temporary setbacks. While it's true that some properties languish on the market for months, countless others have been scooped up by eager buyers in the first week or two on the market. It depends on a lot of factors, including preparation, excellent timing, and a smidgen of good luck!

When you find a home that you love, you probably already have been pre-approved by a bank for a certain amount that will enable you to buy a home. Once you put in an offer on the home and it’s accepted, however, you may need to take a step back. The appraisal can help you to know what the value of the home actually is. The bank may decline your loan based on the appraisal This is one of the most important steps to obtaining the financing that you need to purchase a home. 


What Is An Appraisal? 


In a nutshell, an appraisal protects the bank from investing in a property that’s worth less than what they’re paying for it. This process also protects you as a buyer from buying a property that’s worth less than what you’re expecting it to be worth. 


Although the appraisal makes sense financially, it doesn’t mean that the process won’t be emotional for you as a buyer and for the sellers as well. The appraisal can in fact make or break the purchase of what you consider as your dream home. There’s a lot of data that’s collected for the appraisal, which can cause nerves to be shot on both sides while the value of the home is being calculated.     


What’s The Difference Between The Inspection And The Appraisal?


A home appraisal is much different than an inspection. The home inspection is important in its own right. As a buyer, you hire a home inspector to find any potential problems or hazards that could be big issues for you in the future as a homeowner. While property appraisers will make note of glaring issues, they won’t check out the nuts and bolts of the home like a home inspector will. The home inspector checks out everything from the air quality to the chimney to the toilet and sinks. There’s many things that will affect your home appraisal. In other words, if you’re a seller, you want to get major issues fixed before you put your home on the market. Home inspections will be very important for different reasons to you as a buyer since it will be valuable to you in the future. Appraisers may request an inspection if they notice something serious within the home, but they are more interested in the value of the property than the direct problems that are within the home. 


Who Will Pay For The Appraisal?


Generally, the seller will pay for the home appraisal along with the closing costs. This can be a few hundred dollars. In certain circumstances the buyer may agree to pay for the appraisal, however.   


What Goes Into Calculating The Worth Of A House?


Appraisers look at many different factors including: 

  • The square footage of the property
  • The number of bedrooms
  • How many bathrooms the home has
  • The condition of the home
  • How much have comparable properties have sold for in the area
  • Safety issues
  • Other factors pertaining to health and safety            


The appraisal process can seem complicated, but once you’re educated on the matter, you’ll be prepared when it gets to that point in the home buying process.




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